SaveOurBags.com
Save Our Bags from the "Nanny State" politicians! 
   Home      Speak Out!
 

This page provides a space for people to speak out. The city council and the media do everything they can to make opposition to the bag ban look like a small grumbling minority. The truth is that those opposed are a majority! (Otherwise, why would they need a law to control our behavior?)

If you are opposed to the ban you are not alone! One of the most frequent comments we get is from people who say they are so glad there are others out there who feel as outraged and angry as they do about this ban.
 
Here are some of their comments:



From:

BP
San Jose resident



MF
San Jose resident for over 30 years





BW
San Jose resident










 
 
 

SG
Unincorporated area in San Jose













EL
San Jose resident





GJ
Works in San Jose grocery
store





AK
Aptos





PC
San Jose resident



BB
San Jose resident

 


 




 

Comments:

I have been participating in many a dialogue at the checkstand with other San Jose-ans. There have been only negative responses to the new ban. Even the store employees are apologetic. Our city needs to allow its citizens to vote on this ban. If the vote were taken at the checkstand, we would all be bringing home groceries in plastic bags on January 1.


I was very pleased to read your letter in the Op-Ed page of 12/29/2011 Mercury News.  I was not aware that there was an organized group against the "bag ban" in San Jose. I did send an e-mail to our city council expressing my opposition to the ban and told them that I, and many of my friends, will be shopping in other cities without the ban. This will hurt business in San Jose. I can see a sad state of affairs for the low income people of our city who have to walk to do their shopping and decide how best they can carry their purchases home. I believe that our city officials think that we are not smart enough to do what we can to save our environment without their intervention in our daily lives.


Once again, government takes the easy path to prohibit the use of items rather than working to change behavior. The majority of citizens are made to give-up a convenient method because of the abuse of a small minority.
The problem is not the plastic bag, it’s the user of the bag.
We all dislike seeing our roads littered. But it’s not only plastic bags, but many other items. Plastic bottles, paper of all descriptions, clothing, flat tire fragments, etc. The list is endless. Which of these items will be the next item targeted for banning?
It’s ironic that the last time I witnessed a plastic bag being dropped on the roadway it was from a vehicle with a San Jose city logo. The bag flew out of the back of the pick-up as it passed.
An argument for banning the bag is that it is a single use item. That is not true. There are many additional applications for the plastic bag. The bags can be used to, carry a lunch, tools and other items that need transporting, places individual strings of Christmas lights into a bag to keep them from becoming tangled, storing camping equipment, lining a trash basket, placing the contents of a litter box, and the list goes on.The plastic bag has many uses that do not go away because they are banned.

People will purchase bags to replace the plastic grocery bag. Will these bags also end up on our roadways? If they do, will the government leaders ban them too? Also, has there been a study to find out how many jobs will be eliminated by the ban?




The ban on plastic bags is just another bad example of bureaucracy gone wild.  I make good use of plastic shopping bags and those I don't use, I recycle.  So now we have to buy plastic bags for our trash, throw away the wrapper, then throw away the trash bags.  Sounds like a big savings.
And adding insult to our plight, the San Jose city council has dictated that stores must charge 10 cents per paper bag.  Why?  And who is making the profit on 10 cents per bag,  the stores?  They never charged for bags before.  Can't the stores at least decide what they should charge for their own paper bags?  Perhaps they can sell them in the aisle alongside the plastic trash bags; maybe they can charge 10 cents a dozen for them there, instead of 10 cents apiece at checkout.
For now I put a large plastic box in the trunk of my car.  When going to the grocery store I never know just how much I'll be buying; dragging an unknown number of reusable bags from the house to the car then into the store is not practical.   But many supermarkets ask if you need help going to the car.  That sounds like a service that will be getting more and more use soon.  Or does the city council have plans to make us pay for that as well?  I am sure the city council won't be paying for backs that go bad trying to lift a 40 lb box out of the trunk of a car.
I live in an unincorporated area of Santa Clara County. All the stores within 12 miles of my house are in the city of San Jose. Except for the distance, it is tempting to take my shopping to another city, where there are no restriction on how my groceries are packed.
Too bad I can't vote in San Jose city elections.  A candidate who would repeal this ban would get my vote.



1) Why do people insist on calling them single use bags? We use ours at least twice if not more.
2) Why, if plastic bags are so bad, are we still able to buy boxes of them (Glad, Sunny Select, trash and lawn bags etc.) at the store?

3) We just bought 16 rolls of toilet paper today. Each bundle of 4 was plastic wrapped separately then the whole thing wrapped in plastic again. Why?
4) This is just like the cell phone law that's not being enforced. Just another "knee jerk reaction" law that makes people think that our politicians are doing something, even if its the wrong thing


I'm in total agreement with your website. I work at a grocery store and it's disgusting what some of the bags look/smell like that people bring in. Will the city council wait tell people start getting sick from contamination or other germs from their food being put in unsanitary bags before they reverse this? It's about the few people who are inconsiderate where to dispose of garbage and the lay off of park/city clean up crews that has made this a problem. Banning the bags was not the solution. It's going to make it a health problem.

 

I am against this ban because it is one more step against the freedom and liberty this country is supposed to be about. The reasons used for this ban by the proponents were not researched by the council before being voted on and many have proven to be false. This is a very common pattern used by statists. They state pure lies and get enough environmental zealots behind the issue to push it through, not caring about truth or dictatorial laws being passed. Their point is forcing this country to live in a government run dictatorship all under the guise of “protecting the people”.


That the people of San Jose would allow city officials to dictate legislation that restricts and taxes a legal product, without a vote of the people, says much about the health of democracy in San Jose, and more about the quality of the citizens who live there.

The bag ban didn’t really hit me till yesterday even though I knew it was coming. My wife and I went to our local Lucky’s store to do our weekly shopping when we noticed many people leaving the store with groceries strewed in their carts and no bags. My blood pressure starting to rise we entered the store. It was all I could do to not lose my mind with the way local, state and federal governments speak for us and we have absolutely no voice in the matter!!!!
District 4’s Kansen Chu spearheaded this movement. Shame on him for not thinking about the greater implications to the local small business in his district (North Valley San Jose)! I like my local Lucky’s in Almaden Valley which is only 1-mile away from our home, but am now going to take my business to Safeway on Union Ave in Los Gatos which isn’t affected by this moronic law!
Like most of us, we used those bags as intended; (1) they were recycled. (2) We used them for our groceries (3) we used them for our trash bags and a host of other uses around our home and elsewhere (4) now we have to buy “new” trash bags that aren’t made of recycled material, and they will be tossed in the trash!